How Much of Essential Oil Should I Use in Candles?

amount of essential oil in candles

The amount of essential oil in candles is not a very critical factor to determine the burning time and fragrance. But it is significant because the longer the amount of essential oil in candles lasts, the more expensive it becomes. The quality of the wax, the construction of the wick and the placement of the wick can have an effect on the burning time and the amount of fragrance released by the candle. If one is purchasing cheap quality but good-looking candles then it is likely to last for a longer period of time. However, the quality of wax is important and it can have an influence on the burning time and the fragrance released by the candle. The amount of essential oil in candles is also dependent on the type of wax used and its formulation.

 

One should make a wise decision when purchasing wax because the quality of the wax would ultimately determine the amount of oil added to the candle. A good quality wax would result in a lesser amount of oil wastage because the wick would not catch on fire. The melted wax would not drip from the candle but would disperse all over the area. The candle would also burn at a slower pace without releasing any smoke or soot. It is cheaper to buy a good quality wax rather than purchasing expensive but low grade wax.

 

The quantity of oil in the wax is a more significant factor to consider than the quality of the wax or the wick. A rule of thumb says that the heavier the wax candle, the less amount of wax should be added. An example would be the candle made up of one fourth to one half of a gram of wax. Another point to be kept in mind is the fragrance which varies according to the type of fragrance. Candles with strong fragrance will require more amount of essential oil while candles with mild fragrance can have a smaller amount of oil in them.

 

It has been seen that candles with stronger fragrance will require larger amount of essential oil in order to produce the desired effect. One way around this is to add a smaller amount of essential oil in the candles. If the candle is made up of one gram of wax, then you can expect to use about five drops of essential oil for each gram of candle. Hence, you need to keep the proportion of the amount of essential oil in your candle in mind. You cannot add a huge amount of essential oil in your candle and expect the candle to burn slowly.

 

The other thing to be kept in mind is the oil content of the candle. The amount of the oil depends on how it is blended with wax. There are various ways to blend the wax. Some of them involve heating the wax and pouring the melted wax into another container while some other ways involves adding the melted wax with the oil content of the wax until the desired amount of oil content is reached. Some methods demand that you use two teaspoons of each essential oil.

 

However, it is not mandatory to use these methods. You can experiment a little bit with the amount of essential oil you use in making candles. This is because the amount of the oil and the time taken for it to get absorbed in the skin affect the product. Achieving a lighter skin tone is one way through which you can reduce the amount of the oil used. But, you should use oils sparingly, if any, for prolonged usage may have adverse effects on the skin.

 

A common question that is raised with regard to the amount of essential oil in candles is whether the oil gets absorbed into the skin of the person who burns the candle. The answer is ‘Yes’ and ‘No’. Yes, the skin does absorb some amount of oil during the burning process. However, it is not a ‘complete’ absorption. Since the process of combustion does not remove all the oil from the candle, the amount of oil left in the skin after burning the candle is negligible.

 

What really matters is the amount of the oil remaining in the wick after it is burnt. The amount of oil left in the wick will depend on many factors like the kind of wax used to burn the candle, the quality of the wax and the quality of the burner. If the amount of the oil left in the wick is negligible then you can use a very little amount of oil to light the candle and see its effect on the body. But, if the amount of the oil remains in the wick after the candle has burned for almost half an hour then it becomes necessary to use the amount of oil prescribed in the ‘autions and precautions’ section of the packaging. This is because the remaining amount of the oil may cause dermatitis on the skin of the individual who has consumed the candle.